Farmworker Maria Diaz works in the pepper fields of Dixon, Calif. Julia Mitric/Capital Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption Julia Mitric/Capital Public Radio

Why California's New Farmworker Overtime Bill May Not Mean Bigger Paychecks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491944679/491984348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cesar Chavez, the head of the United Farm Workers Union, calls for the resignation of Walter Kintz, the first legal counsel for the state Agriculture Labor Relations Board, in Sacramento, Calif., on Sept. 16, 1975. Chavez's efforts in California culminated in landmark legislation that protected the rights of the state's farmworkers and created the ALRB. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP
Morgan McCloy/NPR

For Pickers, Blueberries Mean Easier Labor But More Upheaval

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484015376/485807845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers place the berries directly into the plastic clamshell packages that shoppers will find in stores. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

In Florida, Strawberry Fields Are Not Forever

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470424834/471316422" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Contractors who supply workers to farmers say requirements of the Affordable Care Act and the immigration status of many of the workers create a Catch-22. Maguey Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Maguey Images/Getty Images

Farm Contractors Balk At Obamacare Requirements

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464721340/466120305" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Migrant workers harvest strawberries at a farm near Oxnard, Calif. Ventura County is one of two counties where labor organizers hope to get a Bill of Rights passed to protect farm workers from abuse and wage theft. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

Harvesting oranges near Arcadia, Fla. The sacks that workers carry weigh about 90 pounds when they are full of fruit. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Guest Workers, Legal Yet Not Quite Free, Pick Florida's Oranges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464453958/464664801" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

José Anzaldo, the son of migrant farmworkers, has been to seven schools in three years. He's the subject of a documentary premiering Dec. 28 on PBS. Kate Schermerhorn/Courtesy of ITVS hide caption

toggle caption Kate Schermerhorn/Courtesy of ITVS

Strawberry pickers in Watsonville, Calif. Many farmworkers in the state are out of work because of the severe drought. Those who do have a job are often working harder for less money. Lesley McClurg/For NPR hide caption

toggle caption Lesley McClurg/For NPR

Farmworkers See Jobs, Earnings Shrivel In California Drought

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/434763709/435113648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Food banks have become a primary source of nutrition for rural farmworker communities in the Central Valley. Scott Anger/KQED hide caption

toggle caption Scott Anger/KQED

Amid Fields Of Plenty, A Farmworker's Wife Struggles To Feed Her Family

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/252004699/255199516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Agricultural work, which is physically demanding, is also a risky business venture. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR

Farm Laborers Get A Foothold With Their Own Organic Farms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/207028894/207211969" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Michigan Gala apples on this packing line will soon be in short supply. After a mild fall and winter, then a late-April freeze, Michigan's apple cultivation has dropped 90 percent. Noah Adams/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Noah Adams/NPR

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161276597/161285198" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript