Each strand of DNA is written in a simple language composed of four letters: A, T, C and G. Your code is unique and could be used to find you. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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By sequencing a newborn's genome, doctors could screen for more genetic conditions. But parents could be confronted with confusing or ambiguous data about their baby's health. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The Proton Semiconductor Sequencer from Ion Torrent Systems Inc. is a new DNA sequencing machine designed to sequence the entire human genome in about eight hours for $1,000. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome. Eric Kayne for NPR hide caption

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Watson, now 84, says sequencing helped explain his past sensitivity to certain drugs. But he didn't want to know everything his sequenced genome revealed about his health future. Courtesy of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Scientists See Upside And Downside Of Sequencing Their Own Genes

Prominent geneticists are getting their own genomes decoded, revealing the benefits and risks.

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Slides containing DNA sit in a bay waiting to be analyzed by a genome sequencing machine. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

As Genetic Sequencing Spreads, Excitement, Worries Grow

Some experts are concerned that access to genomic information could stoke fears and invade privacy.

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