Congress has passed a bill that will require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP

Congress Just Passed A GMO Labeling Bill. Nobody's Super Happy About It

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The Senate on Thursday approved a measure that would require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the Senate bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP

Worker Javier Alcantar tends to crops at the Monsanto Co. test field in Woodland, Calif., in 2012. Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

GMOs Are Safe, But Don't Always Deliver On Promises, Top Scientists Say

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In the past two years, many food companies — including candy-makers — have decided to label their products as non-GMO. Because practically all sugar beets in the U.S. are genetically modified, those food products are now using sugar derived from sugar cane. There is no genetically modified sugar cane. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

As Big Candy Ditches GMOs, Sugar Beet Farmers Hit A Sour Patch

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A mockup of a possible GMO label on a can of Campbell's Spaghetti-Os, with these words: "Partially produced with genetic engineering." Unless Congress or a federal court intervene, Vermont's new GMO labeling law will go into effect in July. So some companies are scrambling to comply. Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company

How Little Vermont Got Big Food Companies To Label GMOs

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A mockup of a possible GMO label on a can of Campbell's Spaghetti-Os, with these words: "Partially produced with genetic engineering." Lawmakers are scrambling to piece together a national GMO labeling standard before July 1. Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company

AquaBounty's salmon (rear) have been genetically modified to grow to market size in about half the time as a normal salmon — 16 to 18 months, rather than three years. MCT /Landov hide caption

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MCT /Landov

Genetically Modified Salmon Is Safe To Eat, FDA Says

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A bottle of Monsanto's Roundup herbicide in a gardening store in Lille, France. A group convened by the European Food Safety Agency reviewed the available scientific data on the chemical, also known as glyphosate, and concluded that it probably does not cause cancer. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers in Miami, Fla., on April 27, 2015, the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Waiting in line for an exhibit at the Chipotle Cultivate Festival on factory farming. Festivalgoers had to visit four such exhibits to get a free burrito. Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media

'GMO-Free' Is A Boon For Companies Chasing 'Health Halo' Profits

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Now that's a big root: Sweet potatoes aren't tubers, or thickened stems, like potatoes. Sweet potatoes are roots — swollen and packed with starch. U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com hide caption

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U-ichiro Murakami/Flickr.com

Chipotle's announcement that it has removed all GMOs from its menu items is part of a growing food industry trend. From left: Nestle chocolates, Chipotle tortillas, Diet Pepsi, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner, a Subway sandwich. All of these companies have dropped ingredients over the past year in response to consumer demands. Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto

Arctic Granny (right), a GMO variety created by Okanagan Specialty Fruits, got the gren light from federal regulators Friday. The apple doesn't turn brown like a conventional Granny Smith apple (left). Okanagan Specialty Fruits hide caption

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Okanagan Specialty Fruits

GMO Apples Get The Nod, But Not Much Of A Welcoming Party

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A couple of male, genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes take flight. Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec hide caption

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Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec

Florida Health Officials Hope To Test GMO Mosquitoes This Spring

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