A customer shops for produce at the Hunger Mountain Co-op in April 2013 in Montpelier, Vt. More than a dozen food cooperatives supported the bill that would require the labeling of genetically modified foods. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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A woman shops at a supermarket in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Allen Williams grows corn and soybeans for Clarkson Grain, which has been selling GMO-free grain to Japan for years. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

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After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate. iStockphoto hide caption

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Soon after being sliced, a conventional Granny Smith apple (left) starts to brown, while a newly developed GM Granny Smith stays fresher looking. Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. hide caption

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This GMO Apple Won't Brown. Will That Sour The Fruit's Image?

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Labels on bags of snack foods indicate they are non-GMO food products. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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So What Happens If The Movement To Label GMOs Succeeds?

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Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

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An Argentine farmer stands by his field of trangenic soy, designed for resistance to drought and salinity. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

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