An Argentine farmer stands by his field of trangenic soy, designed for resistance to drought and salinity. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jackie Northam/NPR

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/199168194/199929856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman sells bananas at the Kampala Airport. Ugandans eat about a pound of the fruit, on average, per day. Ronald Kabuubi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ronald Kabuubi/AP

While lots of labels tout their lack of genetically modified ingredients, if California's Prop. 37 succeeds, foods containing GMOs would have to be labeled. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/AP

Italian farmer Giorgio Fidenato picks up what's left of his genetically altered corn after anti-GMO activists trampled it, back in 2010. Paolo Giovannini/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paolo Giovannini/AP