President Obama walks off the stage after speaking about the Affordable Care Act during an event in the East Room of the White House on Thursday. Obama argued that the law is holding insurance companies accountable and putting money back into the pockets of consumers. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Back in 2006, President Bush and Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt talked with reporters during a trip to Florida, where Bush spoke to volunteers helping seniors sign up for the Medicare prescription drug benefit. Mike Stocker/AP hide caption

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In San Jose, Calif., on June 6, President Obama encouraged people to sign up for insurance in the nation's largest health insurance market. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama encourages people to sign up for health insurance exchanges in San Jose, Calif., on June 6. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, unveiled the plans and prices that will be offered by private insurers at a media briefing in Sacramento on Thursday. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Shops and other small firms may be open, but health insurance exchanges will take a little longer before they're ready to offer a full range of health plans for small business customers. hide caption

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Colonoscopy copay? Zero. hide caption

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The heath exchange Mississippi Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney had in mind got turned down by the federal government. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Utah got the go-ahead to run its own insurance exchange, but the federal blessing may not last. hide caption

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Gov. Bill Haslam speaks to reporters after announcing in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday that that he had decided against creating a state-run health insurance exchange. The Republican governor said he will leave it to the federal government to run the marketplace. Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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