Students sort grapes at the University of California, Davis research winery. The winery is experimenting with various methods to conserve water. The hope is that commercial wineries will follow suit. Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis hide caption

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Robert Blanc (left) and his brother, Didier, stand in the middle of their vineyard, Domaine Saint Firmin, near the town of Uzes, in southern France. The area is known for its rosé wine in the summertime, and Robert Blanc says American importers have come looking for theirs. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Why French Winemakers Are Seeing The World Through Rosé-Colored Glasses
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At an October protest, hundreds of "We Are Seneca Lake" members block the gates of Crestwood Midstream to protest against the expansion of fracked gas storage in the Finger Lakes. PR Newswire/AP hide caption

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Residents Fight To Block Fracked Gas In New York's Finger Lakes
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Winemaker Iago Bitarishvili makes wine in clay vessels called qvevri, which he buries underground and fills with white grapes. There are no barrels, vats or monitoring systems for this ancient Georgian method, which is helping drive sales. Bitarishvili plans to bury these new qvevri in his cellar to expand production. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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The St. James vineyard at the Abbey of New Clairvaux. The 20 brothers of the abbey belong to an order with a tradition of winemaking that dates back nearly 900 years. Lisa Morehouse for NPR hide caption

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These Vintner Monks Turn Wilderness Into The Divine Gift Of Wine
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An illustration depicts Jesus Christ transforming water into wine during the wedding at Cana (John 2:7). Joseph Martin Kronheim/Kean Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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What Would Jesus Drink? A Class Exploring Ancient Wines Asks
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Philip James, Chairman of CustomVine, and Kevin Boyer, President and CEO of CustomVine, film a video to promote The Miracle Machine, which turns water into wine with the use of an app. Courtesy of The Miracle Machine hide caption

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Sebastian Zutant is the owner of The Red Hen restaurant in Washington, D.C. He's also a sommelier. He and a friend at DC Brau have developed their own beer-wine mashup. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Blending Red Wine With Porter Ale: A Crossover Beer Worth The Buzz?
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Winemakers are increasingly turning to screw caps. Now consumers are learning to get over their prejudice for cork, too. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Cork Versus Screw Cap: Don't Judge A Wine By How It's Sealed
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Graduate student Zach Dunseth carefully excavates wine jugs found in the ruins of a Canaanite palace that dates back to about 1700 B.C. Eric H. Cline/Courtesy of Eric H. Cline/George Washington University hide caption

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Environmental groups are fighting to stop the leveling of 154 acres of coast redwoods and Douglas firs to make way for grapevines. Courtesy Friends of the Gualala River hide caption

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At Happy Boy Farms near Santa Cruz, Calif., Early Girl tomatoes are grown using dry-farming methods. The tomatoes have become increasingly popular with chefs and wholesalers. Courtesy Jen Lynne/Happy Boy Farms hide caption

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At her bakery in Costa Mesa, Calif., Rachel Klemek sells cabernet brownies made with a flour substitute derived from grape pomace, a byproduct of winemaking packed with nutrients known as polyphenols. Mariana Dale/NPR hide caption

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A worker harvests cabernet sauvignon grapes at a vineyard near Bordeaux, France, in September. Caroline Blumberg/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Capturing Summer's Harvest, One DIY Wine Bottle At A Time
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Winemakers like Stellios Boutaris, shown near his vineyard outside Naoussa, Greece, and other business leaders have been forced to pursue new financial tactics because credit is hard to come by. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Greek Credit Crisis Forces Winemakers, Food Canners To Adapt
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