This view of North America as seen in Google Earth shows colored areas that denote levels of light pollution as detailed in the New World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness. Fabio Falchi et al./AAAS hide caption

toggle caption Fabio Falchi et al./AAAS

Light Pollution Hides Milky Way From 80 Percent Of North Americans, Atlas Shows

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Scientists at the University of Lund in Sweden have shown that dung beetles use mental "snapshots" of the Milky Way to navigate. E. Baird / Lund University hide caption

toggle caption E. Baird / Lund University

Saturn's rings cut across this view of the planet's largest moon, Titan, in this image taken by the Cassini spacecraft on May 12, 2011. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

toggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble's chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn't the only one. Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif. hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

Hubble's Other Telescope And The Day It Rocked Our World

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An image showing the distribution of massive stars in the new study. Our location within the Galaxy is circled in black. J. Urquhart et al./Background image by Robert Hurt of the Spitzer Science Center. hide caption

toggle caption J. Urquhart et al./Background image by Robert Hurt of the Spitzer Science Center.

Just the tiniest slice of what's out there: the Pencil Nebula is pictured in an image from the European Southern Observatory's La Silla facility in Chile. This peculiar cloud of glowing gas is part of a huge ring of wreckage left over after a supernova explosion that took place about 11,000 years ago. ESO hide caption

toggle caption ESO