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Sen. Elizabeth Warren questions John Stumpf, then CEO of Wells Fargo, during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Sept. 20. Pete Marovic/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovic/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senators Investigate Reports Wells Fargo Punished Workers

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In the ongoing scandal engulfing Wells Fargo, the bank says it fired wrongdoers. But some workers say they were trying to blow the whistle and Wells Fargo fired them. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Workers Say Wells Fargo Unfairly Scarred Their Careers

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Workers wash a window at a Samsung shop in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday as the corporation works out how to clean up its sullied reputation. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

The entrance to Wells Fargo Headquarters on California Street in San Francisco. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Former Wells Fargo Employees Describe Toxic Sales Culture, Even At HQ

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Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is sworn in on Capitol Hill, where he is testifying before the House Financial Services Committee about Wells Fargo's opening of unauthorized customer accounts. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

State Treasurer John Chiang (right) at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., in May. On Wednesday, Chiang announced he is suspending major parts of the state's business relationship with Wells Fargo because of a scandal involving unauthorized customer accounts. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf was grilled by the Senate Banking Committee last week over the bank's illegal sales practices. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Wells Fargo CEO To Forfeit Tens Of Millions In Stock Awards Amid Scandal

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A man walks past a Wells Fargo branch in Philadelphia. The banking company says it wants to make good by its customers, but figuring out how to do that will be a tall task. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Wells Fargo's Unauthorized Accounts Likely Hurt Customers' Credit Scores

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John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, arrives to testify in a Senate hearing in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 20. Stumpf was discussing the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Elizabeth Warren questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, about the unauthorized opening of customer accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking Committee hearing Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo. Stumpf testifies today before the Senate Banking Committee about his bank employees opening unauthorized customer accounts. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

A Wells Fargo executive's departure with large stock and options holdings has sparked questions, after the division she ran incurred $185 million in penalties. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Regulators announced Thursday that Wells Fargo is being fined $185 million to settle allegations that it secretly opened unauthorized accounts for customers in order to meet sales goals. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP