Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

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Kobi Tzafrir serves hummus at the Humus Bar, his restaurant north of Tel Aviv, Israel. "If you eat a good hummus, you will feel love from the person who made it," he tells The Salt. "You don't want to stab him." Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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A boy chooses fruit from a stall as Jerusalem market vendors swirl around him. Jonathan Lovekin/Ten Speed Press hide caption

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Jerusalem: A Love Letter To Food And Memories Of Home

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