Stephen Drimalas stands outside his former home in Staten Island's Ocean Breeze neighborhood. He rebuilt his home after Superstorm Sandy but recently decided to sell it to the state of New York. Jennifer Hsu/WNYC hide caption

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After The Waves, Staten Island Homeowner Takes Sandy Buyout

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Artists' renderings of New Meadowland show how the wetland would be designed for human recreational use as well as flood control. The berm shown would be a path through the park when water was low (left). When storms came in, the wetlands would flood, and the berm would protect local development. Courtesy of New Meadowlands hide caption

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N.J. Braces For Future Disasters By Fleeing, And Fortifying, The Coast

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New York state is buying homes like this one in Staten Island's Fox Beach neighborhood as part of a Hurricane Sandy recovery project in the hopes that demolishing them will help nature return and provide a barrier to future storm surges. Matthew Schuerman/WNYC hide caption

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Some On Staten Island Opt For Buyout Of 'Houses That Don't Belong'

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She's open for visitors again. Reena Rose Sibayan /The Jersey Journal/Landov hide caption

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Residents of the East Village in New York City look for cellphone reception Nov. 1 after Hurricane Sandy wiped out power and some cell towers. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Sandy, Questions Linger Over Cellphone Reliability

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A young woman helps bag ready-to-eat meals for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy on Friday. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney pauses while speaking at a campaign rally at the Patriot Center at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., on Monday. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Long Beach, N.Y.: Volunteers unloaded water at an aid distribution center on Sunday. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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A chapel icon that once adorned the front of a beachfront home is one of the few items to have survived what is now known as the Breezy Point fire in Queens. Dina Temple-Raston/NPR hide caption

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Recovery To Take 'Quite A Long Time' In Storm-Ravaged Breezy Point

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Gas customers on foot with portable containers and lines of vehicles wait for gas pumps to open at a service station on Saturday in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that resolving gas shortages could take days. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Rather than sit in their cars, many people on Staten Island today lined up at stations with gas cans — hoping to get a few gallons before supplies ran out. Mike Segar /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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While this pizzeria in Belmar, N.J., remained closed after Hurricane Sandy, Geno D's in Toms River turned out 500 pies to grateful customers on Wednesday. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images hide caption

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After Sandy, It's Pizza And Homemade Meatballs For The Lucky In New Jersey

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What they pull up is discouraging. Normally, 30 seconds under water would bring up a cage full of mostly healthy oysters. This time, Jimmy Bloom pulls up a cage that is barely one-third full. And it's haul is a mix of broken, chipped, meatless oysters. Jeff Cohen for NPR hide caption

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