A young woman helps bag ready-to-eat meals for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy on Friday. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney pauses while speaking at a campaign rally at the Patriot Center at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., on Monday. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Long Beach, N.Y.: Volunteers unloaded water at an aid distribution center on Sunday. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A chapel icon that once adorned the front of a beachfront home is one of the few items to have survived what is now known as the Breezy Point fire in Queens. Dina Temple-Raston/NPR hide caption

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Dina Temple-Raston/NPR

Recovery To Take 'Quite A Long Time' In Storm-Ravaged Breezy Point

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Gas customers on foot with portable containers and lines of vehicles wait for gas pumps to open at a service station on Saturday in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that resolving gas shortages could take days. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Rather than sit in their cars, many people on Staten Island today lined up at stations with gas cans — hoping to get a few gallons before supplies ran out. Mike Segar /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Mike Segar /Reuters /Landov

While this pizzeria in Belmar, N.J., remained closed after Hurricane Sandy, Geno D's in Toms River turned out 500 pies to grateful customers on Wednesday. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

After Sandy, It's Pizza And Homemade Meatballs For The Lucky In New Jersey

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What they pull up is discouraging. Normally, 30 seconds under water would bring up a cage full of mostly healthy oysters. This time, Jimmy Bloom pulls up a cage that is barely one-third full. And it's haul is a mix of broken, chipped, meatless oysters. Jeff Cohen for NPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen for NPR