Superstorm Sandy Superstorm Sandy

Larry Koser Jr. (left) and his son, Matthew, look for important papers and heirlooms inside his house after it was flooded by heavy rains from Hurricane Harvey. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Insurers Gear Up For Deluge Of Claims, Hope To Avoid Sandy Repeat

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Doug Quinn stands on the empty lot where his house used to be. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

Business Of Disaster: Insurance Firms Profited $400 Million After Sandy

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Red Cross Effort To Shut Down Inquiry Fails; Report Calls For Outside Oversight

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Doug Quinn's ranch house in Toms River, N.J., was heavily damaged by flooding during Hurricane Sandy. His insurance company gave him half the value of his home and when he appealed, FEMA sided with the insurance company. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

FEMA's Appeals Process Favored Insurance Companies Almost Every Time

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Kathy Hanlon and her sons, Sergio (left) and Cristian, were traumatized by Superstorm Sandy. Hanlon says her flood insurance company made life after Sandy even more horrible Charles Lane/NPR hide caption

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Charles Lane/NPR

Superstorm Sandy Victims Say FEMA's Role Is Fatally Conflicted

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Dan and Eileen Stapleton in front of their post-Sandy home in Long Beach, N.Y. They say it would cost taxpayers less if insurance just settled their claim. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

After Sandy: Insurance Claim Battles Cost Homeowners, Taxpayers

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She's open for visitors again. Reena Rose Sibayan /The Jersey Journal/Landov hide caption

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Reena Rose Sibayan /The Jersey Journal/Landov

Floodwaters from Superstorm Sandy destroyed the first floor of this house in Staten Island, New York. Most of the people who drowned during the storm died in their homes in low-lying areas of New York and New Jersey. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

In this Jan. 18 photo provided by the NYU Langone Medical Center, a technician examines mice to determine their health at the hospital's complex in New York. New York University/AP hide caption

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New York University/AP

A Tale Of Mice And Medical Research, Wiped Out By A Superstorm

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