Elena Biamon holds coffee berries grown on her farm near Jayuya, a town in Puerto Rico's mountainous interior. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Jay Ruskey grows coffee next to avocados on his farm, Good Land Organics, in Goleta, Calif. The two crops are often grown together in Central America, partly because they can share fertilizer and water. Lisa Morehouse/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption Lisa Morehouse/KQED

A Haitian woman holds cherries from a coffee tree. Haiti's coffee trade was once a flourishing industry, but it has been crippled by decades of deforestation, political chaos and now, climate change. Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Patrick Farrell /MCT /Landov

A fully formed coffee berry, left, is shown next to a damaged coffee berry due to drought, at a coffee farm in Santo Antonio do Jardim, Brazil on Feb. 6. Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov

Haleuya Habagaro says she always knew her coffee was exquisite. "When I roast the coffee, people come to ask where that strong fruity smell is coming from." Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

Eduardo Somarriba is a researcher at the Center for Tropical Agricultural Research and Education in Turrialba, Costa Rica. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR