Mosquitoes in traps are transported back to the county's laboratory for analysis. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Mosquito Hunters Set Traps Across Houston, Search for Signs of Zika

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Key Haven, a Florida neighborhood about a mile east of Key West, is where a test of Oxitec's genetically engineered mosquitoes might take place later this year. Some neighbors have strongly dissented — at public meetings and via yard signs. Nancy Klingener/WLRN hide caption

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Florida Keys Weigh Options For Battling Mosquitoes And Zika

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Standing water and abandoned tires make Houston's Fifth Ward hospitable for mosquitoes. Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography hide caption

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Houston Prepares Now For Zika's Potential Arrival This Summer

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The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a spreader of Zika virus. Jeffrey Arguedas/EPA hide caption

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New Study Makes The Case For A Zika Virus Link To Guillain-Barre

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Sporadic dengue fever outbreaks in Florida in 2009 and 2010 spurred mosquito control efforts in Key West and Miami Beach, shown here. The same mosquito that carries dengue, Aedes aegypti, can transmit Zika. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Florida Governor Ramps Up Mosquito Fight To Stay Ahead Of Zika

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The Aedes aegypti mosquito is one of two types thought to be capable of carrying and transmitting the Zika virus. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Big Zika Virus Outbreak Unlikely In The U.S., Officials Say

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Zika Virus Makes CDC Consider A Travel Warning For Pregnant Women

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Don't bite me: The female of a mosquito called Aedes aegypti can transmit yellow fever, dengue fever and chikungunya. David Scharf/Science Source hide caption

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Chikungunya, A Mosquito-Borne Virus, Might Be Scarier Than We Thought

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Mmm. Smells just like your identical twin. iStockphoto hide caption

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Why Do Mosquitoes Like To Bite You Best? It's In Your Genes

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A couple of male, genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes take flight. Dr Derric Nimmo/Oxitec hide caption

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Florida Health Officials Hope To Test GMO Mosquitoes This Spring

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Marqui Ducarme is aided by his wife after catching chikungunya at his home in Port-au-Prince, May 23. The virus swept through Haiti this spring, infecting more than 40,000 people. Marie Arago/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever. Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images hide caption

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Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

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Red blood cells infected with the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Plasmodium is the parasite that triggers malaria in people. Gary D. Gaugler/Science Source hide caption

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Experimental Malaria Vaccine Blocks The Bad Guy's Exit

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The mosquitoes that feed on people are attracted to over 300 gases and other compounds emitted by human skin. CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

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If you catch dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere, it most likely came from the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Muhammad Mahdi Karim /Wikimedia.org hide caption

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Chiara Andolina, a malaria researcher in Thailand, feeds her mosquito colony by letting the insects bite her right arm. These mosquitoes are picky and will dine only on live human blood. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Mosquito Maven Takes Bites For Malaria Research

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