Prime Minister David Cameron's cat, Larry, sits on the steps of No. 10 Downing St. in London on June 24, the day Brexit voting results were announced. If the Cameron family wants to take Larry along on holiday to France, a Brexit could complicate plans. It's possible that traveling to and from the EU with pets will grow more cumbersome. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Brexit campaigner and former London Mayor Boris Johnson waves after addressing a press conference in central London on Thursday. Johnson said he will not stand to succeed Prime Minister David Cameron, as had been widely expected. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The United Kingdom Independence Party's "Breaking Point" EU referendum campaign poster was deemed so offensive and reminiscent of Nazi propaganda that even the official Leave campaign condemned it. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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The Joint European Torus, a European fusion project in the U.K., gets most of its funding from the EU. Brexit may change that, and the even larger ITER fusion project. EUROfusion hide caption

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Traders at work at ETX Capital work in central London on Monday. Financial markets in the U.K. and around the world have been in turmoil since the Brexit vote last week. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brexit Makes Investors Nervous, But U.K. Recession Isn't Certain

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Nigel Farage, leader of the UKIP party, sits behind a British flag during a special session of European Parliament in Brussels on Tuesday. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Union flags fly as banners across a street in central London on Tuesday. EU leaders attempted to rescue the European project and Prime Minister David Cameron sought to calm fears over the U.K.'s vote to leave the bloc as ratings agencies downgraded the country. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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British Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, the United Kingdom's head financial official, leaves after making a statement at the Treasury in London on Monday. Stefan Rousseau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What To Know About Brexit Today

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British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (left) and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hold a joint press conference after meeting in London on Monday. The U.S. "could not ask for a better friend and ally," Kerry said. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A man wears an anti-immigration T-shirt at the Armed Forces Day Parade in Romford, England on Saturday. Many of those who voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union cited increased immigration as a reason. AP hide caption

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Brexit Fallout: Anxious Immigrants, Backtracking Politicians

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In the wake of the Brexit vote, concerns are building about London's status as a center of international banking. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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How Will Brexit Affect London's Status As A Global Financial Center?

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The Foreign Ministers from EU's founding six countries — Jean Asselborn from Luxemburg, Paolo Gentiloni from Italy, Jean-Marc Ayrault from France, Frank-Walter Steinmeier from Germany, Didier Reynders from Belgium and Bert Koenders from the Netherlands (left to right) — brief the media after a meeting on the so-called Brexit in Berlin, Germany on Saturday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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A young man hands out "Remain" leaflets outside the polling station at Notre Dame Primary School on Thursday in Glasgow, Scotland. As a nation, Scotland voted to remain in the EU; but as a whole, the United Kingdom opted to leave. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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