Family medical histories are used to figure out whether it is worthwhile for a woman to be tested for BRCA genetic mutations, which increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

The condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is inherited and can be a killer. But some of the genetic mutations once thought linked to the illness are actually harmless, geneticists say. Afton Almaraz/Getty Images hide caption

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Afton Almaraz/Getty Images

Study Of Sudden Cardiac Death Exposes Limits Of Genetic Testing

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Milo Lorentzen is 5 years old, and is one of only three people in the world known to have a mutation in a gene called KDM1A. Courtesy of Karen Park hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen Park

When Erika Stallings was 22, she found out that she might have a genetic mutation that greatly increased her risk of cancer. Misha Friedman for NPR hide caption

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Misha Friedman for NPR

More People Seek Genetic Testing, But There Aren't Enough Counselors

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Ultrasound is often used for prenatal screening. It's just one of several prenatal screenings available to pregnant women. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

DNA Blood Test Gives Women A New Option For Prenatal Screening

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The CRISPR enzyme (green and red) binds to a stretch of double-stranded DNA (purple and red), preparing to snip out the faulty part. Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley hide caption

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Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley

A CRISPR Way To Fix Faulty Genes

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Vera Wojtesta was one of 300 babies flagged by New York's newborn screening program as at risk of having life-threatening Krabbe disease. Ben Shutts/Courtesy of the Wojtesta family hide caption

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Ben Shutts/Courtesy of the Wojtesta family

Screening Newborns For Disease Can Leave Families In Limbo

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Slides containing DNA sit in a bay waiting to be analyzed by a genome sequencing machine. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It's Legal For Some Insurers To Discriminate Based On Genes

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