The CRISPR enzyme (green and red) binds to a stretch of double-stranded DNA (purple and red), preparing to snip out the faulty part. Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley hide caption

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A CRISPR Way To Fix Faulty Genes

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Vera Wojtesta was one of 300 babies flagged by New York's newborn screening program as at risk of having life-threatening Krabbe disease. Ben Shutts/Courtesy of the Wojtesta family hide caption

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Screening Newborns For Disease Can Leave Families In Limbo

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Slides containing DNA sit in a bay waiting to be analyzed by a genome sequencing machine. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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It's Legal For Some Insurers To Discriminate Based On Genes

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