In 1955, British spy Kim Philby denied working for the Soviet Union. Eight years later, he defected to Moscow. He went on to speak to Stasi agents in East German, in an event that was captured on film. Harold Clements/Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Philby Speaking In 1981

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Anna Akhmatova, who lived from 1889 to 1966, was a beacon of artistic courage in the face of repression during Soviet times. Her work is now receiving renewed attention. Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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An Unexpected Revival For A Beloved Russian Poet

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Ionel Talpazan's "Fundamental UFO". Courtesy of Henry Boxer Gallery hide caption

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Boyhood Encounter With UFO Inspired Art That Soared Around The World

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This photo provided by the U.S. Government, presented during a trial, shows a photo of Irek Hamidullin surrendering after being wounded by U.S. forces in Afghanistan on Nov. 29, 2009. AP hide caption

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From Blueprints To Betrayal: The Daring, And Downfall, Of A Cold War Spy

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Visitors check out the Soviet-era metro cars exhibited at the Partizanskaya subway station in Moscow, as part of festivities marking the subway system's 80th anniversary. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Glory Of Moscow's 80-Year-Old Subway Tainted By Stalin Connections

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The new Russian Armata T-14 tank shown during the Victory Day military parade in the Red Square in Moscow, on Saturday. Yuri Kochetkov/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Russia Celebrates WWII Victory Over Germany

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Written during the Soviet era, Mikhail Bulgakov's classic novel, The Master and Margarita, continues to resonate in today's Russia. Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulgakov's 'Master' Still Strikes A Chord In Today's Russia

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An Oct. 28, 1985 photo of John A. Walker Jr., being escorted by a federal marshal as he leaves the Montgomery County Detention Center in Rockville, Md., enroute to a federal court in Baltimore. He was ultimately sentenced to life in prison on espionage charges. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Then-Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze flashes a "V" sign in France in 1989, after attending the International Conference on Chemical Weapons. Shevardnadze died Monday at age 86. Derrick Ceyrac/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A typical Russian kitchen inside an apartment built during the early 1960s, when Nikita Khrushchev led the Soviet Union — what later became known as Khrushchev apartments. Courtesy of The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture

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Anna Matveevna came to this communal apartment in St. Petersburg in 1931, when she was 8 years old. Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University hide caption

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How Russia's Shared Kitchens Helped Shape Soviet Politics

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