An Oct. 28, 1985 photo of John A. Walker Jr., being escorted by a federal marshal as he leaves the Montgomery County Detention Center in Rockville, Md., enroute to a federal court in Baltimore. He was ultimately sentenced to life in prison on espionage charges. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Then-Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze flashes a "V" sign in France in 1989, after attending the International Conference on Chemical Weapons. Shevardnadze died Monday at age 86. Derrick Ceyrac/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A typical Russian kitchen inside an apartment built during the early 1960s, when Nikita Khrushchev led the Soviet Union — what later became known as Khrushchev apartments. Courtesy of The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture

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Anna Matveevna came to this communal apartment in St. Petersburg in 1931, when she was 8 years old. Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University hide caption

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How Russia's Shared Kitchens Helped Shape Soviet Politics

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Zhenya drinks heavily with his friends at a Russian bathhouse in The Irony of Fate, a Soviet-era film that Russians still watch on New Year's Day. Via Mosfilm hide caption

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In Russia, A Soviet-Era Movie To Ring In The New Year

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Individually wrapped chocolate-covered hazelnut sweets move along a conveyor belt on the production line at the Roshen Confectionary Corp. factory in Kiev, Ukraine. A Russian ban on Ukraine's chocolate comes at a time when the nation is considering aligning itself with the European Union. Joseph Sywenkyj/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ukraine, A Chocolate Factory And The Fate Of A Woman

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