The drug sold as K2, spike, spice or "synthetic marijuana" may look like dried marijuana leaves. But it's really any of a combination of chemicals created in a lab that are then sprayed on dried plant material. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Surge In Use Of 'Synthetic Marijuana' Still One Step Ahead Of The Law

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Ready to feel the burn? Check out our tips for tiptoeing into hot sauce. John Kuntz/The Plain Dealer/Landov hide caption

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John Kuntz/The Plain Dealer/Landov

Love Hot Sauce? Your Personality May Be A Good Predictor

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Jasjit Kaur Singh, an Indian chef, cooks kaala channa, a traditional spicy Sikh dish. A psychologist says that children who grow up in cultures with lots of spicy food are taught to like spice early on. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Prehistoric Deer Stew? A fragment of pottery found in Neustadt, Germany, is coated in the microscopic remains of crushed mustard seeds and roasted fish and ruminant meat, possibly deer. This shard dates back to about 5,900 years ago. Courtesy of University of York, BioArch hide caption

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Courtesy of University of York, BioArch