Ivo Cassol is a prominent Brazilian senator from the western state of Rondonia in the Amazon. He made his fortune in timber and cattle ranching. Environmentalists say these activities are responsible for much of the deforestation in the rain forest. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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The Amazon, As It Looks To A Man Who Made His Fortune There

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Sunset colors cut through the smoky haze in the Brazilian Amazon. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Scientists Say The Amazon Is Still Teaching Us New Lessons

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Aotus lemurinus, a type of owl monkey also referred to as the gray-bellied night monkey, seen here at the Santa Fe Zoo, in Medellin, Colombia. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A truck carrying hardwood timber drives along a rural road leading to Paragominas, Brazil, on Sept. 23, 2011. The city has become a pioneering "Green City," a model of sustainability with a new economic approach that has seen illegal deforestation virtually halted. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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