Matthew Blair, a researcher at Tennessee State University, examines different varieties of amaranth growing in the university's experimental fields. Emily Siner/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Emily Siner/Nashville Public Radio

The Aztecs Once Revered It. Will You Fall For Amaranth, Too?

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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

A man cleans quinoa grain in Pacoma, Bolivia. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Can Quinoa Farming Go Global Without Leaving Andeans Behind?

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Farmer Geronimo Blanco shows his quinoa plants in Patamanta, Bolivia, in February. A burgeoning global demand for quinoa has led to a threefold price increase since 2006. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

The seeds of this goosefoot plant are known as quinoa, a superfood now in high demand and grown almost exclusively in South America. But some growers think they have the formula to grow it up north. Janet Matanguihan/courtesy Kevin Murphy hide caption

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Janet Matanguihan/courtesy Kevin Murphy