Turns out humans are better at smelling than you might think. CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images

Why Your Sense Of Smell Is Better Than You Might Think

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Molecules in wine stimulate thousands of taste and odor receptors, sending a flavor signal to the brain that triggers massive cognitive computation involving pattern recognition, memory, value judgment, emotion and, of course, pleasure. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images

A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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Your schnoz deserves more respect. epSos .de/Flickr hide caption

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epSos .de/Flickr

Never Mind Eyesight, Your Nose Knows Much More

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Research in mice offers new clues as to why Harold and Kumar were so motivated to get to White Castle. Todd Plitt/Getty Images hide caption

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Todd Plitt/Getty Images

Take a whiff of those pears and peaches: All white wines have a citrus aroma, but some also emit tropical or more subtle fruit flavors, Richard Betts explains in his book. Text copyright 2013 by Richard Betts. Illustrations copyright (c) 2013 by Wendy MacNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. hide caption

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Text copyright 2013 by Richard Betts. Illustrations copyright (c) 2013 by Wendy MacNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

Now we know why we'll never see a common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) sitting on a beet. Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Jan Polabinski/iStockphoto.com