The effects of opioid abuse can go unnoticed at work. George Doyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Opioid Abuse Takes A Toll On Workers And Their Employers

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Fire Doors And Sprinklers Debut At Garment Factories In Bangladesh

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Employees of the U.S. Radium Corp. paint numbers on the faces of wristwatches using dangerous radioactive paint. Dozens of women, known as "radium girls," later died of radium poisoning. One of the last radium girls died this year at 107. Argonne National Laboratory hide caption

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Mae Keane, One Of The Last 'Radium Girls,' Dies At 107

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In 2010, Omar Thornton killed eight colleagues in Manchester, Conn., before killing himself. Private employers used to create their own rules about guns on their property. But over the past five years, many states have adopted laws that allow employees to keep firearms in their vehicles at work. Douglas Healey/Getty Images hide caption

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Do Guns On The Premises Make Workplaces Safer?

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A construction site in San Mateo, Calif., earlier this month. There were 738 deaths of construction workers in the U.S. during 2011, the most of any single industry. The fatality rate per workers was higher, when taken together, in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Sand From Fracking Could Pose Lung Disease Risk To Workers

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A worker makes a cut in the side of a sandstone block at the Cleveland Quarries facility in Vermilion, Ohio, earlier this month. The legal limit on the amount of silica that workers can inhale was set decades ago. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Silica Rule Changes Delayed While Workers Face Health Risks

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the accidental release of chlorine gas at a Tyson Food plant could have been prevented with better communication. April L Brown/AP hide caption

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