A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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Brain imaging experiments found patterns associated with attention span. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Peek At Brain Connections May Reveal Attention Deficits

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BASE jumping: Could there be any other explanation for this than free will? iStockphoto hide caption

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If we are seduced by neuroscience, it might not be the pretty pictures that people find so alluring. Illustration/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Illustration/iStockphoto.com

A visitor to the Wellcome Collection's 2012 exhibition "Brains: The mind as matter" looks at a functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) showing a human brain as it listens to Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" and Kant's third Critique. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images