Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the third night of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Listen To NPR Special Coverage Of The Convention

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence took questions from the media as he and his wife, Karen, left their New York hotel to meet with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on July 15. Pence has drawn criticism from the left and the right for various health care stances. Andres Kudacki/AP hide caption

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Melania Trump, wife of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, waves to the crowd after delivering a speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt Bernie Sanders and Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear together at Portsmouth, N.H. High School where Sanders endorsed Clinton for president of the United States. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Guns won't be allowed inside the Quicken Loans Arena where the RNC will take place but will be in protest zones outside the convention. Mark Gillispie/AP hide caption

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Some Delegates May Carry Guns Around Cleveland During Republican Convention

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Dallas on June 16, 2016. Trump's campaign is struggling to raise money to finance his bid against Democrat Hillary Clinton. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Trump holds a media conference announcing the establishment of Trump University on May 23, 2005, in New York City. Thos Robinson/Getty Images hide caption

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A CD-ROM containing two spreadsheets with names that New York City Board of Elections officials say were purged from voter rolls. Brigid Bergin/WNYC hide caption

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Why Voter Rolls Can Be A Mess

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks during a rally in Washington, D.C., on June 9. Although he didn't win the nomination, Sanders' grass-roots fundraising has broken records. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Will The Millions Of People Who Gave Money To Bernie Sanders Give To Democrats?

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President Obama (L) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) both responded to Donald Trump's comments on terrorism and gun control on Tuesday. (L) Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images and (R) Jeff Swensen/Getty Images) hide caption

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Colorado Democrats pack a gym at a Denver high school during caucuses on March 1, 2016. The crowds and long lines have led to calls for the state to move to an open primary system. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Americans Don't Like Caucuses, But Replacing Them With Primaries Isn't Easy

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