Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte (right) and Freedom Party leader Geert Wilders meet Thursday at the House of Representatives to discuss the formation of the cabinet in The Hague. Many Dutch parties have said they won't work with Wilders' Party of Freedom. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

In Dutch Vote, First Of 3 Key European Elections, Populism Takes Second Place

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Firebrand ethno-nationalist lawmaker Geert Wilders prepares to cast his vote in the Dutch general election Wednesday in The Hague, Netherlands. Exit Polls suggested a poor showing for his party. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Early Results Show Dutch Reject Nationalist Candidate Geert Wilders

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Right-wing Dutch populist leader Geert Wilders gestures as he talks to Prime Minister Mark Rutte during a national televised debate on Monday. Wilders' Freedom Party had been leading in the polls until recently. Yves Herman/AP hide caption

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Yves Herman/AP

Supporters of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan walk to the Dutch consulate in Istanbul on Saturday. Turkey and the Netherlands escalated their spat on Saturday as the Dutch withdrew landing permission for the Turkish foreign minister's plane. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

This stone marten knocked out power to the $7 billion Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator in November 2016 when it touched a 18,000-volt transformer. Natural History Museum Rotterdam hide caption

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Natural History Museum Rotterdam

Dutch lawmaker Geert Wilders talks to reporters at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in July. The Dutch press has dubbed Wilders "the Dutch Donald Trump" because of his rhetoric against immigrants. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

For 'Dutch Donald Trump,' A Surge In Popularity Before March Elections

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The village of Volendam, north of Amsterdam, enjoys almost full employment. It overwhelmingly supports the far-right, anti-immigrant politician Geert Wilders, leader of the Dutch Freedom Party. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

A Prosperous Dutch Village Hopes For A Right-Wing 'Bit Of Revolution'

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As anti-immigrant sentiment rises in the the Netherlands, Dutch television and radio personality Sylvana Simons will be running for a parliamentary seat to help represent immigrants and minorities. Robin van Lonkhuijsen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robin van Lonkhuijsen /AFP/Getty Images

With The Far-Right Rising, Dutch Create Their Own Parties For Immigrants

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Dennis van Berkel, an attorney with the Dutch environmental group Urgenda, stands on an earthen berm on the outskirts of Amsterdam. The water is higher than the land on the other side of the berm. A Dutch court ruled in favor of Urgenda on Wednesday, saying the Dutch government must cut carbon emissions by 25 percent. Environmental groups in other countries were closely watching the case. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

The Dutch Ruling On Climate Change That Could Have A Global Impact

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Much of the Netherlands is below sea level, including Amsterdam. Urgenda argues that any rise in the sea level could have a huge impact on the country. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

A Novel Dutch Lawsuit Demands Government Cut Carbon Emissions

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