Chris Newman, seen at her home in Los Molinos, Calif., calls the change she helped get made to lung cancer treatment guidelines a "small, but very important victory." Courtesy of Chris Newman hide caption

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An artist's illustration shows lung cancer cells lurking among healthy air sacs. David Mack/Science Source hide caption

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Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

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The image on the left is a piece of lung tissue that contains a tumor viewed under normal white light. The right image shows the same piece of tissue after Tumor Paint has been applied. Here it's viewed under infrared light. Areas that are more red and yellow show a concentration of the paint, which means they are more likely to be cancerous. Courtesy of Julie Novak/Blaze Bioscience hide caption

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Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better

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Dr. Jame Abraham used positron emission tomography, or PET, scans to understand differences in brain metabolism before and after chemotherapy. Dr. Jame Abraham hide caption

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Another Side Effect Of Chemotherapy: 'Chemo Brain'

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