A death certificate needs to say more than something vague like "opioid intoxication" to help law enforcement and public health officials curb the distribution of opioids, epidemiologists say. How many drugs did the person take, and which ones? Such details can help families heal, too. Alan Crawford/Getty Images hide caption

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Details On Death Certificates Offer Layers Of Clues To Opioid Epidemic

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Amanda Hensley with her daughter, Valencia. Hensley says several hospitals and clinics she contacted were reluctant to help her quit her opioid habit. "Nobody wants to touch a pregnant woman with an addiction issue." Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Pregnant And Addicted: The Tough Road To Family Health

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Nikko Adam, 22, gets a hug from his mother, Patti Trabosh, after his family picked him up from his sober living facility for a weekend outing. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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A Family Engulfed By Heroin Fights To Keep A Son Alive

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Paramedic Phil Salamone carries naloxone, a drug used to reverse an opioid overdose. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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A Small Town Wonders What To Do When Heroin Is 'Everywhere'

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An Addict, Now Clean, Discusses Needle Exchanges And 'Hope After Heroin'

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Dr. Jessie Gaeta, chief medical officer of Health Care for the Homeless at Boston Medical Center, stands in a conference room that will soon be converted to a place where patients high on heroin or other drugs can be safely monitored. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Boston's Heroin Users Will Soon Get A Safer Place To Be High

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Shortage Of Addiction Counselors Further Strained By Opioid Epidemic

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A long vacant and blighted property was torn down in northwest Rutland this past year. The Rotary Club and other volunteers plan to erect a playground on the property as part of an effort to reclaim a neighborhood hard hit by drugs and crime. Nina Keck/VPR hide caption

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Tragedy Moves A Community To Combat Drug Addiction

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A pharmacist counts pain pills. In an effort to curb the abuse of Oxycontin, Vicodin and other opioid painkillers, some health plans in Massachusetts now limit a patient's initial prescription to a 15-day supply, and plan to halve that number in February. Gabe Souza/Getty Images hide caption

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Insurers Hire Social Workers To Tackle The Opioid Epidemic

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Anatomy Of Addiction: How Heroin And Opioids Hijack The Brain

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A "speedball" mix of heroin and cocaine has caused overdose deaths for decades. Today, high-risk blends may alternatively include heroin or opioid pain pills plus Klonopin, Clonidine, or Fentanyl. Marianne Williams Photography/Flickr RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Drug Cocktails Fuel Massachusetts' Overdose Crisis

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Gretchen Burns-Bergman (center) speaks Wednesday at a rally in front of the White House about ending mass incarceration of drug users. Angus Chen/NPR hide caption

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Listen: on the scene with Moms United by the White House

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