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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Students Drive New Policies As K-12 Sexual Assault Investigations Rise

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A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

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Nicole Boykins is principal at Crocker College Prep in New Orleans. The pre-K through eighth grade school is one of five schools in a program to better serve children who've been exposed to trauma. Clarence Williams/WWNO hide caption

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Clarence Williams/WWNO

When Schools Meet Trauma With Understanding, Not Discipline

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In a recent study from National Center for Education Statistics found even after controlling for academic achievement in high school, black and Latino students attend selective institutions at far lower rates and drop out of college more often. Cesar Okada/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Cesar Okada/Getty Images/iStockphoto

A welcome sign at the city limit of Gardendale, Ala. The city is trying to break away from the larger Jefferson County School System to form its own system. Mark Almond/WBHM hide caption

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Mark Almond/WBHM

This Mostly White City Wants To Leave Its Mostly Black School District

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Teen Night Owls Struggle To Learn And Control Emotions At School

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Zia Simpson, a student and sales assistant in Cape Town, says even her father tells her to tame her Afro. "That generation fought against apartheid, but they still carry around the mentality that green eyes look better on a person, that straight hair looks better on a person." Alan Greenblatt for NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt for NPR

A growing number of states are now mandating some sort of education around sexual assault in public schools. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

To Prevent Sexual Assault, Schools And Parents Start Lessons Early

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Attorney Bert Rein speaks to the media while standing with plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case in 2012 in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A kindergarten teacher in Jerusalem stands with students as they listen to sirens that played nationwide on Thursday to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day. This year, a new national Holocaust curriculum is being fully implemented in kindergarten. Ellen Krosney for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Krosney for NPR

In Israeli Kindergartens, An Early Lesson In The Holocaust

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Tiffany Anderson is credited with turning around the school system in Jennings, Mo. Bill MacDonald/Courtesy of Tiffany Anderson hide caption

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Bill MacDonald/Courtesy of Tiffany Anderson

The Superintendent Who Turned Around A School District

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