While other automakers are working on a gradual progression toward more automation in cars, Google has its eyes on a fully automated self-driving car. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Google Makes The Case For A Hands-Off Approach To Self-Driving Cars

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A member of the media tests a Tesla Motors Model S car with an Autopilot system. Regulators and manufacturers are debating whether self-driving cars should have a licensed driver inside as a safety precaution. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Should Self-Driving Cars Have Drivers Ready To Take Over?

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This Hyundai MOBIS "i-Cockpit Car" simulator let people experience autonomous driving mode at the 2016 technology show CES in Las Vegas. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Self-Driving Cars Are Coming, But Are We Ready For Them?

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There was a lot of excitement in 2012, when the Hiriko car was unveiled at this event at European Union headquarters in Brussels. At the time, the then-president of the European Commission, Jose Manuel Barroso, hailed the car as a trans-Atlantic "exchange between the world of science and the world of business." Zhou Lei/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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How A Folding Electric Vehicle Went From Car Of The Future To 'Obsolete'

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New autopilot features are demonstrated in a Tesla Model S during a Tesla event in Palo Alto, Calif., Wednesday. Beck Diefenbach/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Self-Driving Cars Hit The Streets, Sort Of

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A pedestrian crosses in front of a vehicle as part of a demonstration at Mcity on July 20, on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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In Michigan, A Testing Ground For A Future Of Driverless Cars

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Google X is building a few hundred self-driving cars that have no steering wheel, accelerator pedal or brake pedal. Google hide caption

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Google Is Becoming A Car Manufacturer

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Car companies are picking up automobile concepts such as this Lexus SL 600 Integrated Safety driverless research vehicle, shown at the Consumer Electronics Show in early January in Las Vegas. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Bump On The Road For Driverless Cars Isn't Technology, It's You

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