Sally Deng for NPR

Why The World Isn't Close To Eradicating Guinea Worm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489330803/489361732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This is what's called a "specimen lot" — a large mason jar holding smaller vials of parasitic worms gathered by a researcher in 1927. The Smithsonian collection has more than 120,000 specimen lots. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Kristin Adair/NPR

#NPRWormWeek: Worms Are Bottled Up In The Smithsonian's Crawl Space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488404633/489138668" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former President Jimmy Carter delivers a lecture on the eradication of the Guinea worm at London's House of Lords on Feb. 3. The lecture title: "Final Days of the Fiery Serpent: Guinea Worm Eradication." Eddie Mullholland/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Eddie Mullholland/WPA Pool/Getty Images

Jimmy Carter May Soon Get His 90th Birthday Wish: No More Guinea Worm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480973123/480989060" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical worker Abaare Hussein extracts a Guinea worm from a child's leg in Savelugu Village in northern Ghana in 2007. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images

The Last Days Of Guinea Worm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480669616/480989054" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A long legacy in global health: Former President Jimmy Carter has worked to end neglected diseases since 1982. Here he sits with former South African President Nelson Mandela at a ceremony in Soweto, celebrating a new AIDS project in 2002. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/Getty Images

A comic book captures the attention
 of Guinea worm patients Sadia Mesuna (right) and Fatawu Yakubu at a center for patients in Ghana. Louise Gubb/Courtesy of The Carter Center hide caption

toggle caption Louise Gubb/Courtesy of The Carter Center

On a 2007 visit to Savelugu Hospital in Ghana, President Jimmy Carter asks a group of children if they've had Guinea worm. A raised hand is a yes. Louise Gubb/Courtesy of the Carter Center hide caption

toggle caption Louise Gubb/Courtesy of the Carter Center

Nakal Longolio Acii, 9, had to stay several weeks at a Guinea worm clinic in Eastern Equatoria, South Sudan, while health workers coaxed the parasite out of her leg. Louise Gubb/Courtesy of The Carter Center hide caption

toggle caption Louise Gubb/Courtesy of The Carter Center

Young boys suspected of having Guinea worm infections wait for the parasite to emerge through the skin at a clinic in South Sudan. Louise Gubb/The Carter Center hide caption

toggle caption Louise Gubb/The Carter Center

Hawah Alhassan, 5, contracted Guinea worm in a village near Tamale, Ghana, in 2007. The country eliminated the parasite in 2011. Wes Pope/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Wes Pope/MCT/Landov

A boy with multiple Guinea worms sits outside a containment center in northern Ghana, February 2007. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/MCT /Landov