President Lyndon B. Johnson giving Rep. Michael Feighan the famous "Johnson treatment" --€” using his imposing physical presence to persuade --€” aboard Air Force One during a presidential trip to Cleveland in 1964. LBJ put heavy pressure on Feighan to support the new immigration legislation. Feighan eventually agreed,€” but he demanded a crucial change to the act. Princeton University Library/Simon & Schuster hide caption

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In 1965, A Conservative Tried To Keep America White. His Plan Backfired

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House's Budget Bill Debate Unveiled Democratic Rifts, GOP Ambitions

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A bill proposed by the Senate's Gang of Eight (from left, Jeff Flake, R-Ariz.; Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; John McCain, R-Ariz.; Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Bob Menendez, D-N.J.; Dick Durbin, D-Ill.; and Michael Bennet, D-Colo.) has passed out of committee and is headed for the full Senate. But the fate of the issue in the House is less clear. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Immigration Measure Faces Test In Senate, Rival Bill In House

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Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. (right), talks during a hearing at which he angered Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa (far left). Grassley thought Schumer was accusing him of using the Boston bombings as an excuse to slow or kill the immigration overhaul. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., (second and third from left) announced plans to work on a bipartisan immigration proposal with their colleagues on Jan. 28 on Capitol Hill. They were also some of the first to respond to a leaked White House proposal. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama's speech in Las Vegas on Tuesday on the country's immigration system was as notable for what was said as for what wasn't. Isaac Brekken/AP hide caption

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