House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, says the latest version of the GOP bill would let states decide on required benefits. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

By combining results of common blood tests, the researchers were able to come up with a way to predict risk of diabetes and other chronic diseases. Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Migraine headaches are one example of a chronic illness that typically doesn't respond to quick fixes. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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For Many People, Medical Care Works Best When It's Incremental

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"The people that I know who have lost spouses, children, some of them are so ashamed that they wouldn't even acknowledge it as a cause of death," says A. Thomas McLellan, co-founder of the Treatment Research Institute. Courtesy of Treatment Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Treatment Research Institute

Treating Addiction As A Chronic Disease

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Johnny Reynolds ignored diabetes symptoms and put off going to the doctor for years when he didn't have health insurance. He was afraid he couldn't afford treatment. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

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Anders Kelto/NPR

States That Expand Medicaid Detect More Cases Of Diabetes

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Gaining a few more years of healthy life would be great for individuals, but expensive for Medicare, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Delaying Aging May Have A Bigger Payoff Than Fighting Disease

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Percentage of deaths each year due to neonatal disorders around the globe. Courtesy of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation hide caption

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Courtesy of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Students paste red ribbons on a window to mark World AIDS Day in Nanjing, China, in 2006. Although many infectious diseases have declined in the country, the number of new HIV cases nearly quadrupled between 2007 and 2011. AP hide caption

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AP

Health researchers say the proportion of people in their late 40s to 60s with diabetes, hypertension or obesity has increased over the past two decades. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Aging Poorly: Another Act Of Baby Boomer Rebellion

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