Researchers from the Max Planck Institute excavate the East Gallery of Denisova Cave in Siberia in August 2010. With ancient bone fragments so hard to come by, being able to successfully filter dirt for the DNA of extinct human ancestors can open new doors, research-wise. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dust To Dust: Scientists Find DNA Of Human Ancestors In Cave Floor Dirt

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Archaeologist Layla Salih looks around the ancient site of Nimrud, in northern Iraq, outside Mosul. The Islamic State captured the area in 2014 and destroyed many of its archaeological treasures that date back 3,000 years. The extremist group was recently driven out of Nimrud, allowing Salih and others to come back and survey the extensive damage. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

In Northern Iraq, ISIS Leaves Behind An Archaeological Treasure In Ruins

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The new Grand Egyptian Museum, seen here near the pyramids of Giza in June 2015, is due to open late next year. It will display thousands of artifacts, many of them never shown publicly before. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

Fit For A King: Grand Museum Will Showcase Tut And Egypt's Ancient Culture

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A member of a whaling crew waves a flag at the start of the butchering of a just-captured bowhead whale in the outskirts of Barrow, Alaska, in 1998. Luciana Whitaker/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Chad Sheridan, a cellarmaster at Lakefront Brewery and expert on braggots, helped re-create a recipe for an ancient alcoholic brew discovered in a 2,500-year-old burial plot in what's now Germany. Courtesy of Bettina Arnold hide caption

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Courtesy of Bettina Arnold

A team of archaeologists work at the excavation site in the coastal Israeli city of Ashkelon on June 28. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the shipwreck, while decompressing after a dive of 165 feet beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Greece. Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO hide caption

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Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO

Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

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Among the hominin fossils found at the Mata Menge site on the Indonesian island of Flores was part of a lower jaw. Kinez Riza/Nature hide caption

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Kinez Riza/Nature

Fossils Suggest That Island Life Shrank Our 'Hobbit' Relatives

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A Dundee marmalade jar (left) is among items recently unearthed from a 19th century landfill behind a manor house in East Anglia. In Victorian England, people transitioned from making most things at home to buying them in stores. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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Rich Preston/NPR

Digging Up The Roots Of Modern Waste In Victorian-Era Rubbish

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Researchers found numerous ring-like structures inside France's Bruniquel Cave. They believe they were built by Neanderthals some 176,000 years ago. Etienne FABRE - SSAC hide caption

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Etienne FABRE - SSAC

Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build

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The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Matailong Du/NPR

A replica of Palmyra's 2,000-year-old Arch of Triumph is constructed in London's Trafalgar Square on Monday. The arch, a replica of a monument demolished by ISIS, was made using 3-D imaging produced from photographs. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Easter Island is known best for its hundreds of colossal stone statues depicting human figures. The causes of its societal and economic collapse centuries ago are fiercely debated among scientists. Luis C. Cobo/Flickr hide caption

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Luis C. Cobo/Flickr

A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source

Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

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A view from Earth of a slender crescent moon in close proximity to the two brightest planets in the sky, Venus and Jupiter. Justin Lane/epa/Corbis hide caption

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Justin Lane/epa/Corbis

Track Jupiter's Path Like An Ancient Babylonian

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Loose-leaf green tea of the modern variety. Archaeologists have discovered ancient tea in the tomb of a Chinese emperor who died in 141 B.C. It's the oldest known physical evidence of tea. But scientists aren't sure if the emperor was drinking tea as we know it or using it as medicine. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The position of the hands of this skeleton, one of several excavated at Nataruk, suggests her wrists may have been bound. This woman, found reclining on her left elbow, with fractures on the knees and possibly the left foot, was found surrounded by fish. Marta Mirazon Lahr/Fabio Lahr/Cambridge University hide caption

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Marta Mirazon Lahr/Fabio Lahr/Cambridge University

Wood specialist Mike Bamforth examines the base of a Bronze Age wooden bucket at the excavation site. Dave Webb/Cambridge Archaeology Unit hide caption

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Dave Webb/Cambridge Archaeology Unit

Everyday Life In A Bronze Age Village Emerges In U.K. Excavation

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Geneticists found clues to a disease of iron storage in the remains of several Bronze Age inhabitants of what's now Rathlin Island in Northern Ireland. Chrisgel Ryan Cruz/Flickr hide caption

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Chrisgel Ryan Cruz/Flickr

Millet isn't just one grain but, rather, a ragbag group of small-seeded grasses. Hardy, gluten-free and nutritious, millet has become an "it" grain in recent years. billy1125/Flickr hide caption

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billy1125/Flickr