Medical workers treat Ebola patients at the Eternal Love Winning Africa hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. Three workers at the hospital, including Dr. Kent Brantly (left), have tested positive for Ebola. Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse

Dr. Kent Brantly (right) of Samaritan's Purse gives orders to treat Ebola patients through the doorway of the isolation ward in Monrovia, Liberia. Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse

Construction workers repair the roof inside the isolation area at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Government health workers administer blood tests to check for the Ebola virus in Kenema, Sierra Leone, June 25. Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Reuters/Landov

Medical workers with the nonprofit Doctors Without Borders treat a patient for Ebola in Gueckedou, Guinea. Despite their protective gear, the workers try to maintain human contact with patients by talking with them and getting close enough to look into their eyes. Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos hide caption

itoggle caption Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos

Lack of awareness about Ebola has fueled the outbreak in West Africa. Here, two Liberian women in Lofa read a pamphlet about how to prevent the spread of the virus. Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA/Landov

On the lookout for SARS, an employee checks a baby's temperature at the Ben Gurion Airport in Israel, in 2003. The deadly virus quickly spread around the world once it reached Hong Kong, a central travel hub. Nir Elias/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Nir Elias/Reuters/Landov

Magida Safaoui, right, and an assistant plate tomatoes at a Trio Toques event in April. Safaoui helps out the three chefs who run the restaurant. Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR

The fatality rate in an Ebola outbreak ranges from 25 percent to 90 percent, depending on the particular strain of the virus involved. Cynthia Goldsmith/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

itoggle caption Cynthia Goldsmith/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention