West Africa West Africa

Dr. Kent Brantly speaks about the world's response to Ebola during the Overseas Security Advisory Council's Annual Briefing in Washington, D.C. last month. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Dr. Kent Brantly: Lessons Learned From Fighting Ebola

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Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, talks with Doctors Without Borders staff during a visit in August to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Among the dilemmas that arise when health workers are in their protective garb: What if you can't find the person assigned to be your Ebola Treatment Unit partner? John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

Nurses assist a new patient at an Ebola center in Liberia's Lofa County. As drug trials get underway, patients may receive experimental medicines. Tommy Trenchard/NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard/NPR

Medical Experts Look For New Ways To Test Ebola Drugs

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Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries

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U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power has her temperature taken as she arrives in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Monday. Power is on a visit to West Africa to get a first-hand look at the global response to the epidemic. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

This experimental Ebola vaccine, developed by the U.S. government, is just one of several undergoing small-scale, preliminary testing. University of Maryland School of Medicine/AP hide caption

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University of Maryland School of Medicine/AP

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

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Thomas Nellon (left), 17, and his brother Johnson Nellon, 14, of Liberia smile at their mother in the arrivals area at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York earlier this month. The brothers received a health screening upon arrival. The U.S. says it will step up screening measures for arrivals from Ebola-affected West African countries. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Senegalese fencer Abdoulaye Thiam (left) competed against Jason Rogers of the U.S. during the 2008 Olympics. Due to Ebola fears, a World Cup fencing event set for Senegal this month has been canceled. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images

When a high-risk patient is evacuated, strict precautions are followed. Above, aid workers and doctors in protective gear transfer Manuel Garcia Viejo, a Spanish priest diagnosed with Ebola, to a waiting ambulance at a Madrid airport. Spanish Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

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Spanish Defense Ministry/AP