Protesters set the National Assembly building in Libreville, Gabon, on fire after President Ali Bongo was declared the winner of last weekend's election. Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An Ivorian soldier stands guard on March 18, 2016 at the site of a jihadist shooting rampage at the beach resort of Grand Bassam. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ivory Coast Struggles To Keep Economy Afloat After Terror Attack

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A unidentified family member (right) of a 10-year-old boy that contracted Ebola has her temperature measured by a health worker outside an Ebola clinic on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, on Nov. 20. Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone have now gone 42 days without a single reported case of Ebola. Abbas Dulleh /AP hide caption

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Guinea is where the Ebola outbreak started in West Africa. In this photo from November 2014, workers from the local Red Cross prepare to bury people who died of the virus. Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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5 Mysteries About Ebola: From Bats To Eyeballs To Blood

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Liberian workers dismantle shelters in an Ebola treatment center in the Paynes Ville neighborhood of Monrovia. Doctors Without Borders closed the center last month because it was no longer needed. Zoom Dosso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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As Ebola Crisis Ebbs, Aid Agencies Turn To Building Up Health Systems

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The most recent propaganda videos from Boko Haram have higher production values than in the past and other similarities to ISIS-produced videos. Boko Haram/Sendvid hide caption

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Boko Haram Takes A Page From ISIS Propaganda Playbook

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A health worker with Doctors Without Borders carries a child suspected of having Ebola at the treatment center in Paynesville, Liberia, last October. Ebola is especially deadly for young children and babies. About 4 in 5 infected died. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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The Grandpa Who Saved His Granddaughter From Ebola

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Nick van Praag of Ground Truth meets with locals of Pakistan's Sindh Province in 2013 to see if they're satisfied with efforts to help them recover from previous floods and prevent damage from any future ones. Kai Hopkins/Ground Truth hide caption

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