science fiction science fiction

A scene from the 1990s Sci-Fi film Timecop, featuring Jean-Claude Van Damme (left). Ronald Siemoneit/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Siemoneit/Sygma via Getty Images

It Sounds Like Science Fiction But ... It's A Cliché

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When a person places a finger in the slot on the left, the robot uses an algorithm — unpredictable even to its creator — to decide whether to prick the finger with the pin on the end of its arm. Alexander Reben hide caption

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Alexander Reben

A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

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An interior view of the fictional Selig family's house. Here, in the kitchen, a portal — one of many — leads out of the house into the otherworldly beyond. Lindsey Kennedy/Courtesy of Meow Wolf hide caption

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Lindsey Kennedy/Courtesy of Meow Wolf

DIY Artists Paint The Town Strange, With Some Help From George R.R. Martin

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Matt Damon portrays an astronaut who relies on science to survive on a hostile planet. Giles Keyte/EPKTV hide caption

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Giles Keyte/EPKTV

How 'The Martian' Became A Science Love Story

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

What If The Drought Doesn't End? 'The Water Knife' Is One Possibility

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Best-selling author Liu Cixin's science fiction books are breaking new ground in China's literary world. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Cultural Revolution-Meets-Aliens: Chinese Writer Takes On Sci-Fi

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