A reconstruction of a Neanderthal man (right) based on skull found at the La Ferrassie rock shelter in Dordogne Valley, France. He's face to face with a male Homo sapien. Philippe Plailly & Atelier Daynes/Science Source hide caption

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Science Seeks Clues To Human Health In Neanderthal DNA

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The area around the confluence of the Silverthrone and Klinaklini glaciers in southwestern British Columbia provides a glimpse into how the terrain traveled by Native Americans in Pleistocene times may have appeared. David J. Meltzer/Science hide caption

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2 Gene Studies Suggest First Migrants To Americas A Complex Mix

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Researcher Svante Pääbo, was able to extract a complete genome from this ancient human leg bone. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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A 45,000-Year-Old Leg Bone Reveals The Oldest Human Genome Yet

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A zygote begins its journey to expression in the form of a human being. Science Picture Co./Science Faction/Getty Images hide caption

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