A box of 3-D models 24-year-old student Amos Dudley made of his teeth. The model labeled "3" rests on a 3-D-printed tray Dudley made to make impressions of his teeth with a putty-like material. Also in the box are a clear plastic aligner and other 3-D models used to make more aligners, each one pushing the problematic teeth further into place. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jon Kalish for NPR

New Jersey Student Uses 3-D Printer For DIY Dental Work

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A 3-D printed bust of Yoda is one of the more popular digital designs shared on Thingiverse. Courtesy of StruveDesigns.com hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of StruveDesigns.com

As 3-D Printing Becomes More Accessible, Copyright Questions Arise

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