Musician David Lowery of Camper Van Beethoven and Cracker says Spotify streamed his songs without his permission. Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images hide caption

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Spotify Faces Class Action For Copyright Infringement

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A service technician uses a diagnostic device in front of a diesel engine in a Volkswagen Touran in an auto repair shop in Hanover, Germany. Researchers have been pushing for freedom to learn more about the code inside cars in the fallout of the VW software-rigging scandal. Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Heath Miller of the Pittsburgh Steelers catches the ball on the 1-yard line against defender Brandon Flowers of the San Diego Chargers during Monday's game in San Diego. Donald Miralle/Getty Images hide caption

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Twitter's Suspension Of Sports Media Revives Debate Over Fair Use

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Farmer Dave Alford can't fix his own tractors like this one because it's run by software with proprietary digital locks. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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DIY Tractor Repair Runs Afoul Of Copyright Law

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A Chinese court says that Qiaodan Sports' logo of a basketball player's silhouette does not infringe on Air Jordan's famous "jumpman." Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Trademark Woes Of Michael Jordan (And Many Others) In China

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Do You Want To Build A Lawsuit? China Totally Copied 'Frozen,' Kid Says

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Comedian Ari Shaffir performs at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in June in Manchester, Tenn. Shaffir has said fellow comedian Carlos Mencia stole his joke about who would build a fence on the U.S.-Mexican border. Copyright on jokes is difficult to prove, and it turned out two other comedians had made similar jokes as well. John Davisson/Invision/AP hide caption

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Everyone knows how to sing "Happy Birthday to You." But performing the song in movies or on TV requires payment of sometimes hefty licensing fees. Now the song is at the heart of a lawsuit. iStockphoto hide caption

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'Happy Birthday' Hits Sour Notes When It Comes To Song's Free Use

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The e-book's original cover image was used without permission, according to a lawsuit filed against Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Apple. Amazon via The Daily Beast hide caption

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An Ohio Couple Would Like To Forget 'A Gronking To Remember'

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cover McSweeney's hide caption

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Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age

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Nike-owned Converse, the company responsible for the Chuck Taylor All Star shoe, is suing to stop other shoemakers from copying what it says are distinctive elements of its design. Grant Halverson/AP hide caption

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Bucking The Fashion Trend, Converse Kicks Up A Fuss About Knockoffs

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This 2011 image taken by a crested black macaque in Indonesia has ignited a debate over who owns the photo. The camera's owner says the image belongs to him. In its new manual, the U.S. Copyright Office disagrees. David J Slater/Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Law professor Lawrence Lessig has reached a settlement with an Australian record label that tried to sue him for infringement. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

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A law designed to protect copyrights on music and movies put digital locks on all sorts of things. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why The Library Of Congress Has A Lock On Your Phone

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A 3-D printed bust of Yoda is one of the more popular digital designs shared on Thingiverse. Courtesy of StruveDesigns.com hide caption

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As 3-D Printing Becomes More Accessible, Copyright Questions Arise

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