Bryan Ferry's new album, Avonmore, comes out Nov. 17. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Cyber Warfare, Wearables In Tech, And New Music From Bryan Ferry
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Isabelle Olsson, the lead designer of Google Glass, says she is encouraging more women to enter the tech industry — not just as designers, but in all capacities. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Wearable Tech, One Size Does Not Fit All
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Shane Walker uses Google Glass while driving. His favorite feature is the ability to record his trips and send them to friends. Aarti Shahani/KQED hide caption

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Does Google Glass Distract Drivers? The Debate Is On
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Cecilia Abadie wears her Google Glass as she talks with her attorney outside traffic court in December. A California Highway Patrol officer gave Abadie two citations in October; she was cleared of both infractions Thursday. Lenny Ignelzi/AP hide caption

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A California driver who received a ticket for wearing a Google Glass headset this week says the existing laws are unclear. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Blaszczuk used Google Glass to shoot this self portait. Courtesy of Alex Blaszczuk hide caption

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Accessible Designs Could Help Us All — But Only If Firms Bite
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Stephen Balaban has re-engineered his Google Glass to allow for facial recognition. Courtesy of Stephen Balaban hide caption

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Clever Hacks Give Google Glass Many Unintended Powers
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Filmmaker Chris Barrett wearing his Google Glass. He is among the first 1,000 nondeveloper testers of the product. Jennifer Rubinovitz/Courtesy of Chris Barrett hide caption

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Arrest Caught On Google Glass Reignites Privacy Debate
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A visitor at the "NEXT Berlin" conference tries out Google Glass on April 24 in Berlin. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Google Fights Glass Backlash Before It Even Hits The Street
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Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google Glass glasses at an event on the University of California, San Francisco's Mission Bay campus on Feb. 20. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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