Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in a lab in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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How An Electric Shock Could One Day Protect You From Zika

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This year's flu vaccine protects against a few different virus strains, including the H1N1 seen here. The fuzzy outer layer is made of proteins that allow the virus to attach to human cells. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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Inside Each Flu Shot, Months Of Virus Tracking And Predictions

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April 1959: Bottles containing the polio vaccine. M. McKeown/Getty Images hide caption

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The Oral Polio Vaccine Can Go 'Feral,' But WHO Vows to Tame It

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Two polio cases have been reported in Ukraine, where some parents are fearful of vaccinations. Above: A child receives the diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus vaccine in a children's hospital in Kiev. Sergei Chuzavkov/AP hide caption

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A woman receives the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine at a clinical trial in Conakry, Guinea. The vaccine appears effective after only one shot. Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ebola Vaccine Hailed As 'Game Changer' In Fight Against The Virus

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A baby helps make history. The Kenyan child is receiving the new malaria vaccine — the first ever that can wipe out a parasite — as part of a clinical trial. Karel Prinsloo/AP hide caption

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Why A Vaccine That Works Only A Third Of The Time Is Still A Good Deal

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This did not really happen. Cows' heads did not emerge from the bodies of people newly inoculated against smallpox. But fear of the vaccine was so widespread that it prompted British satirist James Gillray to create this spoof in 1802. H. Humphrey/Henry Barton Jacobs Collection, Institute of the History of Medicine, JHU hide caption

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A Cow Head Will Not Erupt From Your Body If You Get A Smallpox Vaccine

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Vikram is the first child to wear a Khushi Baby necklace, which will keep track of his immunizations. He's at a vaccine clinic in Rajasthan, India. Ruchit Nagar/Courtesy of Khushi Baby hide caption

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Which flu vaccine should you get? That may depend on your age and your general health. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Flu Season Brings Stronger Vaccines And Revised Advice

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