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A Fix For Gender-Bias In Animal Research Could Help Humans

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When so-called senescent cells were removed from mice, they were healthier and lived longer than mice that still had the cells. Philippe Merle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Boosting Life Span By Clearing Out Cellular Clutter

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Researchers hope Guam's snakes take the bait. Micha Klootwijk/iStockPhoto.com hide caption

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Bob Adams is a lab animal veterinarian at Johns Hopkins University. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Shutdown Imperils Costly Lab Mice, Years Of Research

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This image shows a human glial cell (green) among normal mouse glial cells (red). The human cell is larger, sends out more fibers and has more connections than do mouse cells. Mice with this type of human cell implanted in their brains perform better on learning and memory tests than do typical mice. Courtesy of Steven Goldman hide caption

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To Make Mice Smarter, Add A Few Human Brain Cells

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