A probiotic commonly found in yogurt seems to help women lose more weight and fat, a recent study finds. But you still have to eat healthy to see an effect. iStockphoto hide caption

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You tried burping. You tried bouncing. You tried swaddling. Now what? iStockphoto hide caption

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Can Probiotics Help Soothe Colicky Babies?

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The interior of the nose is like a lush rain forest that's barely been explored. Courtesy of Sunje Pamp hide caption

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A sweet way to avoid the dentist? Microbiologists are developing a probiotic mint that uses dead bacteria to fight off cavities. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Microbiologist Christina Agapakis (left) and artist Sissel Tolass show off the cheese they made with bacteria from human skin. The project was part of Agapakis' graduate thesis at Harvard Medical School. Courtesy of Grow Your Own ... Life After Nature at Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

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He's not just getting a cold. He's building his microbiome. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues

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Knight (left) and Bucheli take soil samples from beneath one of the decomposing bodies. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Could Detectives Use Microbes To Solve Murders?

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Billie Iverson, 86, of Cranston, R.I., recently underwent a transplant of intestinal microbes that likely saved her life. Ryan T. Conaty for NPR hide caption

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Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix

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We may not see them, but we need them. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

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