Fortified dwelling and open air banquet, detail from a mosaic portraying a Nilotic landscape from El Alia, Tunisia. Roman Civilisation, 2nd century. Musée National Du Bardo (Archaeological Museum) DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DeAgostini/Getty Images

Tiny minerals in the clay of this jar hold information about the strength of the Earth's magnetic field at the time the jar was fired, thousands of years ago. Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits hide caption

toggle caption
Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits

Khoshaba Jaber, an Assyrian living in West London, plays a tambura, a traditional instrument known as the "mother of strings," after singing an epic poem he learned in his boyhood village in northern Iraq. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alice Fordham/NPR

In England, An Effort To Preserve Ancient, Epic Assyrian Poetry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/509140180/509722845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk past a replica of an ancient statue of a human-headed winged bull from Nimrud, Iraq, destroyed by the Islamic State. It's part of an exhibition called "Rising from Destruction" at Rome's Colosseum. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Replicas Of Artifacts Destroyed By ISIS 'Rising From Destruction' In Rome

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497350345/497350346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Antikythera team members Nikolas Giannoulakis, Theotokis Theodoulou, and Brendan Foley inspect small finds from the shipwreck, while decompressing after a dive of 165 feet beneath the surface of the Mediterranean Sea in Greece. Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO hide caption

toggle caption
Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/ARGO

Ancient Shipwreck Off Greek Island Yields A Different Sort Of Treasure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483115572/483811586" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tourists at Persepolis marvel at the grandeur of a bygone age amid worries about the future. Steve Inskeep/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Inskeep/NPR

At Persepolis, Iran's Grand Past Overshadows Its Frustrating Present

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467205019/467318891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ava Gene's, a Roman-inspired restaurant in Portland, Ore., incorporates colatura, a modern descendant of ancient Roman fish sauce, into several of its dishes. Deena Prichep/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deena Prichep/NPR

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/240237774/240955358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The moon is one of the most obvious natural indicators that the passing of time follows a pattern and can be tracked in a useful way. Bill McKelvie/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
Bill McKelvie/iStockphoto.com