jewish food jewish food

Joan Nathan, the author of 11 cookbooks, has sought out local Jewish food traditions as she's traveled the world. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Beck Harlan/NPR

A World Of Flavors In A Single Dish: How Jewish Food Spread Across The Globe

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Idan Cohen's grandmother's famous German layer cake. Idan's mom always said that the Israeli climate did not agree with this cake, but she made it anyway. Courtesy of Jewish Food Society hide caption

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Courtesy of Jewish Food Society

Last Friday night, the Berlin bookstore Shakespeare and Sons hosted a Sabbath dinner as part of the pre-kickoff activities for Nosh Berlin, the German capital's first Jewish food festival. Guests at the bookstore included many non-Jewish Germans who purchased tickets. Veronica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Veronica Zaragovia for NPR

Jews commemorate Hanukkah by eating fried foods. For most American Jews, that means latkes — potato pancakes fried in oil. But other cultures toss different foods into pots of boiling oil. Take, for example, these fried and jam-filled doughnuts, called sufganiyot in Hebrew, on display at a bakery in Kadima in central Israel. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Matzo ball soup is a classic recipe straight from Eastern Europe. But not all Jews from the region came to the New World via Ellis Island, as reflected in this jalapeño-inflected family recipe from chef Pati Jinich. Copyright Ellen Silverman hide caption

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Copyright Ellen Silverman

For Rosh Hashana, A Matzo Ball Soup By Way Of Mexico

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Herbed gefilte fish is baked in a terrine for a brighter, fresher take on tradition. Lauren Volo/The Gefilte Manifesto hide caption

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Lauren Volo/The Gefilte Manifesto

'The Gefilte Manifesto': A Loved, And Loathed, Jewish Staple Gets Updated

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A Passover Seder table. During Passover, Jews avoid leavened bread. But whether legumes, corn and rice are OK has long been a point of contention among Jews of European and Middle Eastern ancestry. Now, rabbis have weighed in. Reza/Getty Images hide caption

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Reza/Getty Images

Beans And Rice For Passover? A Divisive Question Gets The Rabbis' OK

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Manischewitz is closely associated with Jewish tradition, but it was once a huge crossover success. Sammy Davis Jr. was its spokesman in TV advertising. At one point, the typical drinker was described as an urban African-American man. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

After his mother-in-law's death, NPR's Marc Silver found her go-to cookbook, filled with her copious annotations to recipes. He used it to piece together her take on mandelbread, a Jewish version of biscotti, and other holiday favorites. Akash Ghai/NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/NPR

"Honey cake is considered the fruitcake of the kosher kitchen," jokes cookbook author Marcy Goldman. "The same resistance people may have to fruitcake, a lot of people have about honey cake." With her recipe — now the go-to recipe for thousands of families — Goldman modernizes this sweet taste of the past. Deena Prichep for NPR hide caption

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Deena Prichep for NPR

The Jewish Fruitcake: Honey Cake Is A Sweet And Stodgy Tradition

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A rabbi (center) supervises the production of Passover matzos at the Streit's factory on New York's Lower East Side, circa 1960s. This Passover will be Streit's last one at the landmark location. AP hide caption

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AP

How The Matzo Crumbles: Iconic Streit's Factory To Leave Manhattan

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Wrapped in gold and silver foil, chocolate gelt are often handed out as a little treat for children (and adults) during Hanukkah. Turns out, the tradition is rooted in real money. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Hanukkah History: Those Chocolate Coins Were Once Real Tips

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