Victoria Thomas' backyard was overrun with rats a few years ago. She tried everything from trenching and underground fencing to poison traps but nothing worked — until she got three feral cats. Courtesy of Victoria Thomas hide caption

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Facing A Growing Rat Problem, A Neighborhood Sets Off The Cat Patrol

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Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster. Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo hide caption

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Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

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Victoria, a 2-year-old rat, sniffs for TNT, sticking her nose high in the air to indicate she's found some. She works her way down a 10-meter line with a handler on either end, and is able to detect the presence of TNT at a distance of approximately half a yard. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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In Cambodia, Rats Are Being Trained To Sniff Out Land Mines And Save Lives

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In the study, muscle cells were injected into the cell-free "scaffolding" of a rat limb, which provided shape and structure onto which regenerated tissue could grow. Bernhard Jank, MD/Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine hide caption

toggle caption Bernhard Jank, MD/Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine

In Massachusetts Lab, Scientists Grow An Artificial Rat Limb

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Gerbils are harmless... Right? Peter Knight/Flickr hide caption

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Rats Blamed For Bubonic Plague, But Gerbils May Be The Real Villains

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Who, me? The Asian relative of this domestic gerbil is a well-known host to the bacteria that cause plague. Valentina Storti/Flickr hide caption

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Gerbils Likely Pushed Plague To Europe in Middle Ages

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New Yorkers can take city-run classes to learn how to make their homes and businesses less attractive to these guys. Ludovic Bertron/Flickr hide caption

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Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent 'Reservoirs'

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Rats aren't only problem in Tehran. These were running free over the weekend in Luton, England. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media /Landov hide caption

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